Fermi National Laboratory

Volume 26  |  Friday, July 25, 2003  |  Number 12
In This Issue  |  FermiNews Main Page

Fermilab Technicians - Couldn't Do It Without Them

by Michael Witherell

BEAMS DIVISION
www-bd.fnal.gov
208 Technicians
4 Lab Assistants
3 Lab Techs
15 Tech I
52 Tech II
73 SR Tech
34 Tech Specialist
18 Operations Specialist
9 Operations Specialist SR
BUSINESS SERVICES SECTION
http://www-bss.fnal.gov
2 Technicians
2 SR Techs
COMPUTING DIVISION
http://computing.fnal.gov
19 Technicians
2 Tech II
7 SR Tech
9 Tech Specialist
1 Operations Specialist
DIRECTORATE
www.fnal.gov/directorate
1 Technician
1 Tech II
ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY AND HEALTH SECTION
www-esh.fnal.gov
16 Technicians
5 Tech II
5 SR Tech
6 Tech Specialist
FACILITIES ENGINEERING SERVICES SECTION
www-fess.fnal.gov
9 Technicians
1 Tech II
3 SR Techs
3 Tech Specialist
2 Operations Specialist
LABORATORY SERVICES SECTION
http://fnalpubs.fnal.gov/lssection
2 Technicians
1 Lab Techs
1 Tech II
PARTICLE PHYSICS DIVISION
http://ppd.fnal.gov
167 Technicians
2 Lab Techs
14 Tech I
28 Tech II
68 SR Tech
41 Tech Specialist
9 Operations Specialist
5 Operations Specialist SR
TECHNICAL DIVISION
www-td.fnal.gov
74 Technicians
1 Tech I
24 Tech II
35 SR Tech
6 Tech Specialist
6 Operations Specialist
2 Operations Specialist SR
W herever you look at Fermilab—in every division and section, in experiments, computing, accelerator operations, R&D, infrastructure, safety, the environment —you find teams of outstanding technicians at work. More than 450 strong, they build, operate, maintain, fix and develop the tools of particle physics research that make Fermilab a great physics laboratory.

As a field, high-energy physics has always depended on the skills of generations of talented and dedicated technicians. Today, as the tools of our science grow increasingly sophisticated, the role of technicians is more important, and more challenging, than ever. Twenty-first century particle physics requires extraordinary technical skills and capabilities. Fermilab's technicians meet the challenge every day—as well as nights and weekends. With this issue of FERMINEWS, the laboratory recognizes the vital part they play in achieving Fermilab's scientific mission.

Modern particle physics experiment collaborations number hundreds of university scientists from across the globe. None of these experiments would function without the day-in, day-out contributions of the technicians who work alongside physicists and engineers to build, repair, maintain and operate these almost unimaginably complex scientific instruments. Similar collaborations operate Fermilab's unique accelerator complex, with its thousands of magnets, pumps, joints, vacuum systems, electronics, power supplies, wires, cables, cryogenic systems and instruments. Others build, test and deliver the components for the particle physics of the future, the high-field superconducting magnets that Fermilab will supply to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Still others keep our infrastructure functioning, our computer networks operating, our water and our electric power flowing, our workplace safe and our environment sound. Collectively, Fermilab's technicians possess a wealth of unique technical knowledge and experience that could never be replaced. We could not do it without them.

On June 26, many technicians gathered outside Wilson Hall for a photo to honor their contribution and their key role in the life of our laboratory. I wish we had room in this issue to recognize all the technicians at Fermilab. Although the pages of FERMINEWS can highlight only some of the outstanding work and fascinating stories of Fermilab technicians, my thanks go out to every one of them.




last modified 7/28/2003   email Fermilab