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Tevatron experiments report latest results in search for Higgs boson

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Click to read answers to FAQ about the Higgs boson.



Observed and expected exclusion limits for a Standard Model Higgs boson at the 95-percent confidence level for the combined CDF and DZero analyses. The limits are expressed as multiples of the SM prediction for test masses chosen every 5 GeV/c2 in the range of 100 to 200 GeV/c2. The points are joined by straight lines for better readability. The yellow and green bands indicate the 68- and 95-percent probability regions, in the absence of a signal.The difference between the observed and expected limits around 124 GeV could be explained by the presense of a Higgs boson whose mass would lie between 115 to 135 GeV. The CDF and DZero data exclude a Higgs boson between 147 and 179 GeV/c2 at the 95-percent confidence level.



Blocked from view until 3 a.m. CST. See here:
http://tevnphwg.fnal.gov/results/SM_Higgs_Winter_12/

The graph shows the range of masses for the Higgs boson compatible with the latest Tevatron data, in the assumption that the observed excess is caused by the presence of a Higgs boson with the features predicted by the standard theory.



Higgs field can slow down some (otherwise massless) elementary particles—like a vat of molasses slowing down a high-speed bullet. Such particles would behave like massive particles traveling at less than light speed. Other particles—such as the photons of light—are immune to the field: they do not slow down and remain massless.



Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln describes the concept of how the search for the Higgs boson is accomplished.



At the Tevatron, which makes protons and antiprotons collide, scientists focus on finding signs for the decay of the Higgs particle into a bottom quark and anti-bottom quark.



At the Large Hadron Collider, which smashes protons into protons, scientists focus on finding signs for the decay of the Higgs particle into two photons.



The 4-mile in circumference Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab uses superconducting magnets chilled to minus 450 degrees Fahrenheit, as cold as outer space, to move particles at nearly the speed of light.



The Tevatron typically produces about 10 million proton-antiproton collisions per second. Each collision produces hundreds of particles. About 200 collisions per second are recorded at each detector for further analysis.



The three-story, 6,000-ton CDF detector takes snapshots of the particles that emerge when protons and antiprotons collide.



The three-story, 6,000-ton CDF detector takes snapshots of the particles that emerge when protons and antiprotons collide.



Control room for CDF where particle sprays from collisions are analyzed.



Scientists measure the energy, momentum and electric charges of subatomic particles using a three-story assembly of sub detectors wrapped around DZero's collision area like the layers of an onion.



Scientists measure the energy, momentum and electric charges of subatomic particles using a three-story assembly of sub detectors wrapped around DZero's collision area like the layers of an onion.



Control room for DZero where particle sprays from collisions are analyzed.



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last modified 03/06/2012 |